Become Part of the NōD Team

NōD Magazine is seeking undergraduate student volunteers for the 2018-2019 academic year! We are the University of Calgary’s sole creative writing publication, wherein poetry, prose, and visual artwork is professionally printed in a journal twice a year.

You do not need to be an English student to work with us; we welcome volunteers from all faculties and are seeking people to join as executive editors and volunteers for general submission readings on our collectives.

Of course, there are lots of other responsibilities that go into a magazine too! We also need help with procedures like social media promotion, community engagement (ie. attending readings, speaking at lectures, promoting NōD to other clubs you’re involved with), poster designs/graphics, event planning (finding great launch locations, collaboration opportunities, etc) and more!

Benefits of volunteering with us include: forming connections within an awesome community of creative people, first hand experience working on a real publication, an opportunity to hone your editing/reading skills, something great to put on your CV/ resume and co-curricular record, inspiration for your own writing, event planning experience and more!

If this sounds interesting to you, send an email to nodmagazine@gmail.com with VOLUNTEER in the subject line and give us a sense of who you are and what you’d like to be involved with.

The Editorial Team at NōD looks forward to hearing from you!

Official Issue 23 Launch Party!

Launch PartyGood news! We are happy to announce the official launch date for our upcoming issue! We will be hosting @ Shelf Life Books on Tuesday, April 24th from 7pm – 10pm. Come listen to some fantastic readings from our local creatives and find out more about our upcoming changes to our magazine! For more information, you can find us: https://www.facebook.com/events/154687578681472/

We hope to see you all there!

Sincerely,
The NōDitorial

 

Terri’s Editor Fave: “Statistically Speaking” by Kimberly Peterson

Hello readers! Today we have our Fiction Editor, Terri Scott’s favorite piece from Issue 22. Her choice is “Statistically Speaking” by Kimberly Peterson.

A graduate of University of Calgary, Kimberly Peterson writes poetry and creative nonfiction. Her work has appeared in publications, including Room Magazine, Poetry Breakfast, Drunk Monkeys, 3Element Review, Black Napkin, Byword, Forage Poetry Forum and Generation Magazine. She has pieces accepted for publication in The Banister and In/Word Magazine.

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Statistically Speaking

 

You have studied me,

developed an equation for the curve of my breasts,

counted the beads of sweat in the small of my back.

You have calculated p values and covariance,

ran linear regressions that supported your theory,

reduced me to a count of corpuscles and capillaries,

bled me of my words.

 

I don’t want to be the hornet enchanted by

the back door light, oblivious to the night sky.

We sit at the fulcrum of practical and the magical,

come splash in Milky Way puddles with me.

Kirsten’s Editor Fave: “Remembering the Paste Girls”

As our Issue 23 issue submission deadline looms closer, take a look at our Poetry Editor, Kirsten Cordingley’s favorite piece from Issue 22. Her choice is “Remembering the Paste Girls” by Jenny Wong.

JENNY WONG is a writer, traveler, and occasional business analyst.  When she’s not attempting to use her computer science degree for good, she’s writing and/or cohabitating with her wise-cracking husband and their grumpy middle-aged dog.  Her publications include The Quilliad, 3Elements Review, Peacock Journal, Vallum, and Cha.

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REMEMBERING THE PASTE GIRLS

 

Watch out for her.

She’s got a strong adhesive side

and sticky fingers for bondage,

and people will decorate her with words

like “loyal” and “committed”,

admire how strong she stays

and supports the dry white love

scratching between them

and their macaroni elbows.

 

People say it’s rare to find a relationship like that.

 

But, lets face it, we were all glue sniffers once.

Some of us just moved on

to a more natural attraction

of static cling and sparks.